Latin American Cinema takes NY this February

08/02/2012 at 9:47 am Leave a comment


Two events will take place this February in New York with the latest short film productions and Documentary films from Latin America new yorkers will welcome: MoMA’s Documentary Fortnight and NewLatino Filmmakers Screening Series.
From february 16th MoMA’s Documentary Fortnight will Open with Tatiana Huezo Sanchez‘s “The Tiniest Place,” who will both be in attendance for a post-screening Q&A sessions.
Established in 2001, MoMA’s annual two-week showcase of recent nonfiction film and media takes place each February. This international selection of films presents a wide range of creative categories that extend the idea of the documentary form, examines the relationship between contemporary art and nonfiction filmmaking, and reflects on new areas of nonfiction practice. This year’s festival includes both feature-length and short documentary films, a retrospective of works from Paper Tiger Television’s 30 years of media activism, and a seminar on database documentary practices—an emergent form of interactive narrative and nonlinear filmmaking that employs computer and Web-based media. The majority of films in the festival are premieres, and filmmakers will be present at most screenings. Special off-site events take place at Light Industry in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, and at Nitehawk Cinema in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (Closing Night).
The festival runs from February 16-28th
For full programme click here.

On February 8th, NewFilmmakers NY will present an evening of works by Latino Filmmakers.
Programme:
Paul Kakert TRAIN TO NOWHERE: INSIDE AN IMMIGRANT DEATH INVESTIGATION
Explore the deaths of 11 undocumented immigrants from Mexico and Central America, found in railcar in a small Iowa farm town in 2002. Told through a victim’s brother, an immigration agent, and a train conductor working with the smugglers.

Michael Diaz THE TICKETS

In order to score concert tickets to see their favorite band’s one-time reunion concert, Danny and Mick organize a heist of their own AA meeting. The robbery doesn’t go as planned.

Sonia Gonzalez-Martinez URBAN LULLABUY

Unemployed artist Nina is at her breaking point in her noisy Bronx neighborhood. She is too intimidated to step to Mateo, her young, thuggish neighbor and source of the noise.

Gloria La Morte CRUSH

Prom Night in the South Bronx, Michael is in for the an evening of horror, hilarity and hope as he decides whether or not to man up and kick it to his high school Crush or punk out and let him walk into the sunset.

Hugo Perez SEED
The year is 2022, a decade after the world famine and food riots, and the Mendelian Corporation now bioengineers the world’s entire commercial food supply through genetically-modified seeds, and has outlawed natural “heirloom” seeds which can only be found on the black market.

J.W. Cortes CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR
Jason Cruz (JW Cortes), is an Iraq war veteran arrested amidst allegations of murdering unarmed Iraqi children. Jason attempts to detach himself from his unsuspecting family in an effort to save them from his pang of conscience.

Manuela Senatore A JOURNEY TO HOMELAND
Marcela, a woman from Colombia, relocates to New York to find a career but has to decide if what she finds is worth the loss of what she has left behind.

Rafael Salazar Moreno CAMILO
Jeremy, a young Latin American journalist living and working in New York, is moving into an apartment with his girlfriend the following day, but receives a phone call one evening telling him he has to go to Haiti to cover the earthquake.

Will Fonseca CHANGING DIEGO
Changing Diego is the story of Diego Morales (Anthony Cruz) a shy, young paralegal who lives with his parents and his eccentric grandmother who believes in the supernatural. Diego is head-over-heels over Marissa Mercado (Yomaris Maldonado) his co-worker.

For more information

Source: Latam Film

Entry filed under: DOCUMENTARIES, LATAM FILM, LATIN AMERICAN FILM. Tags: , , , , , .

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